Support

Key Skills Support

Observing and Recording

Pupils are often asked to draw and observe real objects to improve their ability to record and draw accurately. Try to help your child set these objects up and also to position a small lamp next to them to provide shadows. Most pupils forget to use their pencil lightly and forget to sketch rather than keeping their pencil fixed on the paper producing a continuous line. Remind your child to do this and suggest marking out some very light lines at the start to work out the angles and size of the object in front of them. Adding Tone – Pupils are always asked to add shading (tone) to their drawings. Look for the shadow being cast and start to shade by moving the pencil in a steady direction with the darkest tone nearest the object. Using a blunt pencil held on its side makes adding tone easier. The entire object should have tone with some areas in shadow and some areas in full light with highlights.

Design and Problem Solving

Certificate classes all participate in a design unit. This involves pupils coming up with a variety of ideas and possible answers to a design problem. The best designers come up with lots of variations and possibilities and try different approaches before settling on their final design solution. You can help by encouraging your child to look at examples of design that already exists in the area they are working within such as fashion, products, jewellery or graphics (posters, menus, cd, book covers). Think about how they can vary their ideas for example changing the lettering style, surface colours or materials. Most importantly discussing which designs work well and why can lead to even better ideas.

Critical Analysis

All pupils at various stages are asked to look at artworks or design and describe, discuss, and evaluate various aspects of the work. Using the many gallery websites and describing what is visible in a painting is a good starting point to enhance vocabulary and support a detailed description. Pupils should start their description in a factual manner stating what appears in each area within the painting. Discussing and describing shape, line, colour, shadows, paint techniques, mood, atmosphere, feelings and their opinion is a good building point. Keywords such as composition (the layout and positioning of everything in the painting) focal point (the main area of the work), perspective (lines showing depth and distance), background, foreground and horizon line should be used within their descriptions. Try to encourage your child to discuss mood, atmosphere and meaning by imagining being a part of the painting to discuss the senses you might encounter such as noises, smells or the weather.

Hints and Tips for Helping with Homework (Art Drawing)

Pupils are often asked to draw and observe real objects to improve their ability to record and draw accurately. Try to help your child set these objects up and also to position a small lamp next to them to provide shadows. Most pupils forget to use their pencil lightly and forget to sketch rather than keeping their pencil fixed on the paper producing a continuous line. Remind your child to do this and suggest marking out some very light lines at the start to work out the angles and size of the object in front of them. Adding Tone – Pupils are always asked to add shading (tone) to their drawings. Look for the shadow being cast and start to shade by moving the pencil in a steady direction with the darkest tone nearest the object. Using a blunt pencil held on its side makes adding tone easier. The entire object should have tone with some areas in shadow and some areas in full light with highlights.

Departmental Study Support Activities

Departmental drop in sessions are held on:

MONDAY – 3.35 – 5 p.m – Art club

THURSDAY – 3:45 – 5 p.m – Supported Study

Lunchtimes and after school by arrangement.